19 responses to “License your work with a Creative Commons license”

  1. Kelly Allison

    My colleague Marie Nightbird and I created these guidelines for giving peer feedback in our Communication Skills for Social Work Practice class. We gave it a creative commons attribution 4.0 International License.

  2. Hana Kim

    I used my library’s newsletter for this exercise.

    East Asian Library’s Newsletter by Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library is licensed under Attribution 4.0 International

    East Asian Library’s Newsletter by Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library is licensed under Attribution 4.0 International

  3. Lindsay

    I used the google slides I share with the other instructors who teach the course I designed for this activity. I gave them a CC-BY-NC license.
    https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/e/2PACX-1vQNPlNA9menvzJOHkIIT7nUvZOb6HYPtk1xAFqJEEC6CHsTed0M63iiV6g99r08Ve9dI41H5CfraQ0P/pub?start=false&loop=false&delayms=3000

  4. Luisa Canuto

    I am attaching some google slides of a learning activity I recently developed for my low intermediate Italian language course (ITAL 301). For this activity students have to work in groups and develop an infographic with some recent and accurate statistical information on a topic of their choosing. Their infographic needs to provide a comparison between Italy and Canada on that topic. An example of an infographic is provided.

    https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/11k_CiwBmdKlLdIvIt2FWZb1tdgNtdr0nJQStg3HYzxg/edit#slide=id.g88bc641eaf_2_14

  5. Maya Krol

    For this activity, I used an introductory PubMed tutorial that I developed for the UTSC library. It has been given an Attribution-Non Commercial 4.0 International license.
    http://app.sidecarlearning.ca/tutorials/introduction-to-pubmed-h8o4

  6. Andrew Clarke

    Here’s a resource I created to explain a framework for the formulation of experience. I have released it with a CC license.
    https://app.box.com/s/pvrrhqptxv0zpwxc1kqp9wbvfvwohzg6

  7. Daisy D

    I created a guide to working with Articulate Storyline. This guide now has a CC BY-NC license.

    https://inforum.library.utoronto.ca/workshops/building-and-publishing-interactive-online-workshops-articulate-storyline-0

  8. Bart McLeroy

    I took a photo on my Flickr stream that I enjoy quite a bit (from Vancouver, WA) and had been featured in several photography groups, and gave it a CC BY-NC-SA license. I’m happy with it being shared and adapted, but I want to be credited, and I want it done non-commercially. I had previously had it under a BY-NC license, but I changed it to include the SA because I want to “pay it forward” in terms of open access.

  9. David Gill

    I had to teach a Library Workshop for Applied Communications students. The topic of the workshop was copyright and creative commons. On the credits page, you will see that the slides format and some of the photos are by different creators. Along with providing credit to them, I wrote “All Copyright and Creative Commons content except when otherwise noted is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0”

    Anyone can edit this google slides link https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1BOFAB5OHyQzZKibyPLl-niRC9CNfbonfVPu1SnIbKVA/edit?usp=sharing

  10. Vanessa Chan

    I made this when I was still learning Japanese in high school, but I still think it’s a handy reference for people learning hiragana stroke order. Hopefully with a Creative Commons License people can improve on the way it is displayed. I might try to make a katakana version of this in the future and try to make it more accessible.

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/16KvtH4VP0zjAxCXnsQaHvzyz9F6BzroSzJXgqbmLO2o/edit?usp=sharing

  11. Rebecca Ford

    I edited a Creative Commons picture of Nefertiti to accentuate the age lines shown in Egyptian art and appreciated in beauty standards. I shared it back on Flickr with a CC BY-NC-SA license, as I wanted attribution and for it to be not used commercially. I included the share alike option as this was a part of the license attached to the original image I edited.

    https://flickr.com/photos/192631827@N04/51073506123/in/dateposted-public/

  12. Pam

    I edited and added a CC licence to a set of clicker questions that I created and have been using for a few years. I chose the CC 4.0 BY-NC-SA option because I wanted people to not use the resource commercially (although I know there is a chance it will, as has happened with countless course resources, even when we added full copyright licenses) and I want people to be able to track down where the resource came from.
    As I think about the most appropriate/useful way of sharing them, they are temporarily in a Google Drive folder: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1-FaZqhxzLQCZEjb0FF-BjuMumE1Eh73N/view?usp=sharing
    Ideally, before sharing with “the world” I would like to include an answer key with comments and examples of how the resource can be used (including how I have successfully, and unsuccessfully used in my classes).

  13. Permjit Buadhwal Mann

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1FJUj2Usa4JywQZObnhsYYmNGC8XO_lCW9h5u3UM9zNI/edit?usp=sharing

    Hello,
    I chose an assignment from one of my classes for CC licensing.
    The topic was to cover all the requirements for staffing a newly created prison library.
    I chose the following Creative Commons License for the work.
    Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
    CC BY-NC-SA
    As the creator of this work I am assuming I have the copyright, so I would like credit (retain the rights) for doing the initial work (BY)
    I do not think the course assignment work can be owned by the school which I was attending, however, I believe this is not the case for researchers?
    As this assignment was for my schoolwork, I do not wish others to use it for commercial purposes especially because I am not sure of how the school would view this usage (NC).
    I wish to allow others to reuse and remix the contents of this assignment as needed (SA).
    All external sources are cited in the text. One quote in the assignment is from a government of Canada site,(usually open access).

  14. permjit buadhwal mann

    The license is CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 International

  15. Neah Ingram-Monteiro

    I added a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License to an infographic I created for a course on scholarly communications and publishing: https://neah.ubcarts.ca/activities/knowledge-translation-infographic/

  16. Erin Calhoun

    I added a CC BY-NC 4.0 license to my small online learning video I created for a class on information literacy that shows users how to access Hathi Trust from the library’s online catalogue. https://vimeo.com/535491502

  17. Ksenia Cheinman

    I recently published an article in an industry publication on the topic of how to have effective design conversations https://alistapart.com/article/navigating-the-awkward/. While the article was not released under a Creative Commons license, I asked if the support document I was including could be released under a Creative Commons license and was given green light. So the resulting conversational framework https://docs.google.com/document/d/1txBFHwqyhtrevXZYCaUk4P5UNFqpc2au9sTUGTdjkWA/edit# has the CC BY attribution.

    I’ve also been making an intentional effort to license articles I publish on Medium under CC BY license. In the “More settings” option of each article, there is actually a way to update the licensing, this results in a visible indication of what license is applied to an article at the bottom; you can see an example of this in Making learning inclusive – template for accessible presentations https://medium.com/gc-share/making-learning-inclusive-a-template-for-accessible-presentations-b0d8b2762372.

  18. Ksenia Cheinman

    I recently published an article in an industry publication on the topic of how to have effective design conversations. While the article was not released under a Creative Commons license, I asked if the support document I was including could be released under a Creative Commons license and was given green light. So the resulting conversational framework has the CC BY attribution.

    I’ve also been making an intentional effort to license articles I publish on Medium under CC BY license. In the “More settings” option of each article, there is actually a way to update the licensing, this results in a visible indication of what license is applied to an article at the bottom; you can see an example of this in Making learning inclusive – template for accessible presentations.

  19. Elliot Montpellier

    I liked the idea that Hana had above about her newsletter and I’d published something along the lines this as part of a blog series in our library called “Diversity in the Stacks”. I’ve reached out to the librarian in charge, to see if we could add the license to the piece. A good exercise in going back and seeing if things I’ve already put out there, especially on non-journal platforms, could be open licensed.

    Hopefully by the time someone clicks on it, the CC license will appear!
    https://www.library.upenn.edu/blogs/libraries-news/diversity-stacks-pakistani-vernacular-languages

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